Annotated Bibliography Voting and Public Opinion

ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY: VOTING AND PUBLIC OPINION 10

Bartels, L. M. (2000). Partisanship and voting behavior,1952-1996. Princeton University.

In this article, the author attempts to assert that the aspect ofindependent voters who are not influenced by partisan loyalty isquickly fading away. Partisan loyalty has rebounded significantly andpeople are making voting decisions based on their loyalty to the twomajor parties in America. The author uses past research by otherscholars to affirm that partisanship indeed influences the votingbehavior. The main objective of the author is to clearly state thatthe aspect of partisan loyalty is a countrywide phenomenon which runsacross all races. The author’s arguments in the article, backed byintensive research gives the assertions credence. The text iscoherent and the arguments in the article flow with additionalevidence in every paragraph.

Bartels, L. M. (2008). The Study of Electoral Behavior.Department of Politics and Woodrow Wilson School of Public andInternational Affairs, Princeton University.

The author is this article focuses on the analysis of the electoralbehavior in the past 70 years. The author is quick to acknowledgethat he may not be able cover every aspect and will only address someof the historical underpinnings of electoral behavior. The authorprovides a clear analysis of the historical research of electoralbehavior starting with the research at Columbia University. Hefollowed this with the famous Michigan model from the University ofMichigan. The author asserts that the Michigan model was in use byscholars until the 1970s. The focus was mainly on the American voterwho was said to be the foundation for electoral behavior research.Bartels completes the article by calling upon the 21stscholars no to rely on the data that was collected in the 1940s, butto collect fresh data if they want to remain relevant.

Hillygus, S. &amp Jackman, S. (2003). Voter Decision Making inElection 2000: Campaign Effects, Partisan Activation, and theClinton Legacy. American Journal of Political Science, Vol. 47,No. 4. Midwest Political Science Association.

Hillygus and Jackman address the issue of the effects of campaignson voter decisions. The article has clearly relied on research toidentify that campaigns, debates and the attitude of the peopletowards a prudential candidate do indeed affect the voter decision.The authors have pointed out in the article that there is movement ofvoters as a result of the campaigns. It is useful to realize that theauthors of the article relied on 2000 election data to make theassertions in the article. This provides an honest and credibleopinion of the issue of voter decision making. The authors of thearticle provide realistic and factual information based on data andresearch. The authors have acknowledged that the research is limitedand cannot identify exactly how each campaign in 2000 influencedvoter preference differently.

Sides, J., Citrin J. &amp Schickler, E. (2003). What if EveryoneVoted? Simulating the Impact of Increased Turnout in SenateElections. American Journal of Political Science, Vol. 47, No. 1. Midwest Political Science Association.

This article addresses the effects of high voter turnout in senateelections in the United States. The authors have highlighted clearlythat an increased voter turnout would benefit the Democraticcandidates and their policies. The article relied on research anddata on different voter turnouts and the effects. The opinions andassertions given in the article are factual and realistic based onthe research and the data collected. The authors have also assertedthat the voter turnout and partisan loyalty vary across the variousstates and time. The article has also carried out intensive researchon the partisanship of the voters and the non-voters. According tothe authors, the non-voters are more democratic than the voters. Theentire article is well organized and highlights the differentoutcomes of varying levels of voter turnout.

Macmanus, S. (2011). Voter participation and turnout. Female starpower attracts women voters. Gender elections.

This is an article that addresses the issue of women voting withreference to the 2008 elections. The authors of the article havegiven a brief history of how women gained the right to vote and theway they voted in 2008 presidential elections. The article stipulatesthat the American women population constitutes the largest portion ofregistered and actual voters. It is clear from the research conductedthat the presidential candidates used their spouses to campaign andalso used other celebrities such as TV stars and female artists fortheir campaigns. The article has also highlighted how the women havebenefited from the various electoral reforms. It is clear that thearticle highlights all the aspects of women voting and it iscredibility is not in doubt since it relies on intensive research.

McDonald, P. &amp Popkin, S. (2001). The Myth of the VanishingVoter. The American Political Science Review, Vol. 95, No. 4. American Political Science Association.

This article addresses the issue of low voter turnout in the UnitedStates. The authors of the article suggest that there was only adecline of voter turnout was only evident in the 1960s. Since then,there might have been lower turnout, but there is no more decline.The authors fail, however, to point out to the reasons why there wasa declining trend of turnout in the 1960s. The authors blame theinstitution structure in the US for the lower turnout. Aspects suchas separation of power and the two elections are the major causes oflow voter turnout. Additionally, the authors have provided the basisfor calculating the levels of low turnout of voters.

Sierra, M. (2010). Latinas and electoral politics. Movin’ on up.Gender elections.

The article mainly focuses on the participation of Latinos in theelections. The article has clearly highlighted that the number ofLatino voters has increased significantly over the years. The 2008election was a testimony of this increment. The authors of thearticle have argued that the Latino voters especially the women wereinfluential in the 2008 win of President Obama. There has been anincrease in the registration of Latino voters and they are having avoice especially in closely contested elections. The article assertsthat the issue of gender and race are influential in the presidentialelections. The Latinos loyalty to the Democratic Party is not knownwhen it is going to end. The article has relied heavily on researchand data from the 2008 elections. The article gives a balanced andhonest opinion regarding the role of the role of Latinos inpresidential elections.

Deckman, Dolan &amp Swers. (2012). The gender gap in elections andpublic opinion. Women and politics.

This article addresses the struggle by candidates and politicalparties to attract the women vote in the United States. It is clearfrom the article that women voters in the US are attracted or moreaffiliated to the Democratic Party and or the Democratic leadershipthan men. Research done by the authors in the article assert thatthese number is not as a result of the increased number of women inthe Democratic party, but it rather as a result of the women wholeave the party. The authors of the article have asserted that theDemocratic Party’s interest in social issues attracts women andretains them. The article is an interesting read and its research isoriginal and authentic

Lewis, B., et al. (2011). The American voter. Perceptions of theparties and the candidates. The University of Michigan press:University of Michigan.

The main focus of this article is how a voter makes a decision onwho to vote for. Voters make decisions based on various elements. Theauthors of this writing have clearly stated that the voter mustconsider the candidate before voting. The political party and theissues the political party seeks to address are also factorsconsidered by the voter. The authors have used a case study of GeorgeBush and how his perceptions in the minds of the voters helped him toascend to power. It is clear that the authors carried out deepresearch before coming up with this writing. The authors haveaddressed the perceptions of the parties such as the Republican Partyand the efforts it has had in trying to revive its image regardingthe social issues.

Inglehart, R. &amp Norris, P. (2010). Women’s and men’s votingbehavior in a global perspective. Women, gender and politics.

This article has focused on the effects of developmental theory onthe party preferences of both men and women. The authors state thatresearch has indicated women have been more conservative in thevoting behavior than men. There has been a gender gap since timeimmemorial and the article has clearly addressed this issue. Theauthors have asserted that women have since changed and no longerconservative especially in the developed countries such the US. It isclear that the authors of the article agree that gender gaps stillexist albeit in a less degree. The authors have also addressed thenature of the gender gap where they asserted that the modern gendergap is more prevalent among the young people while the traditionalgender gap exists among the old aged people. The article is rich withinformation regarding the gender gap and the authors seem as historyscholars.

Lewis, B. et al., (2008). Voting turnout. University of MichiganPress: University of Michigan.

This article addresses the issue of why some people turn out to votewhile other fail to turn up. The authors have highlighted clearlythat even presidential elections fail to attract a high number ofvoters. There are various aspects that have been addressed in thearticle some of them being the effects of the candidate on voterturnout and the willingness to participate in a political process.The authors of the article have accused the complex voterregistration process for the lower voter turnout in elections. Thearticle relied on research and data collected before and after apresidential election. The article is coherent and the ideas flowfreely in the article. The opinions and the assertions made are basedsolely on evidence.

Druckman, N. &amp Leeper, T. (2012). Is Public Opinion Stable?Resolving the Micro/Macro Disconnect in Studies of Public Opinion.

The article addresses the issue of whether public opinion matters.The authors have asserted that indeed public opinion matters. Theyhave addressed the communal and the individual public opinion andstated that the communal public opinion matters more than theindividual public opinion. Public opinions, according to the article,affects the outcome of elections. Additionally, the authors haveasserted that the political leaders try their best to influence andchange the public opinion in their favor. It is worth noting that indemocratic government, the public opinion forms the policies of thegovernment. Since the article bases its argument on original andauthentic research, it can be argued that the information herein isuseful and authentic.

References

Lewis, B., et al. (2011). The American voter. Perceptions of theparties and the candidates. The University of Michigan press:University of Michigan.

Deckman, Dolan &amp Swers. (2012). The gender gap in elections andpublic opinion. Women and politics.

Sierra, M. (2010). Latinas and electoral politics. Movin’ on up.Gender elections.

McDonald, P. &amp Popkin, S. (2001). The Myth of the VanishingVoter. The American Political Science Review, Vol. 95, No. 4. American Political Science Association.

Bartels, L. M. (2000). Partisanship and voting behavior,1952-1996. Princeton University.

Bartels, L. M. (2008). The Study of Electoral Behavior.Department of Politics and Woodrow Wilson School of Public andInternational Affairs, Princeton University.

Macmanus, S. (2011). Voter participation and turnout. Female starpower attracts women voters. Gender elections.

Sides, J., Citrin J. &amp Schickler, E. (2003). What if EveryoneVoted? Simulating the Impact of Increased Turnout in SenateElections. American Journal of Political Science, Vol. 47, No. 1. Midwest Political Science Association.

Hillygus, S. &amp Jackman, S. (2003). Voter Decision Making inElection 2000: Campaign Effects, Partisan Activation, and theClinton Legacy. American Journal of Political Science, Vol. 47,No. 4. Midwest Political Science Association.

Inglehart, R. &amp Norris, P. (2010). Women’s and men’s votingbehavior in a global perspective. Women, gender and politics.

Druckman, N. &amp Leeper, T. (2012). Is Public Opinion Stable?Resolving the Micro/Macro Disconnect in Studies of Public Opinion.

Lewis, B. et al., (2008). Voting turnout. University of MichiganPress: University of Michigan.