ART MOVEMENT

ARTMOVEMENT

Conversionon the Way to Damascus-Caravaggio in the Baroque Movement

  1. There is an overlapping effect of figures in the Conversion on the Way to Damascus-Caravaggio painting making it look a bit jumbled. This was very different from Renaissance paintings that had clear lines of each figures. The placement of the characters is not in an orderly manner, they are positioned in such a way that they intensify the moment of conversion. St. Paul who is the main character is flung off his horse and is on his back on the ground, the horse is right in front of him while the groom is standing behind the horse in an overlapping manner.
  2. Depictions feel physically and psychologically real and this is achieved through the dramatic use of color. The painting shows Paul as broken down with his arms up and overcome by another man with a brightly visible horse. This serves to illustrate Saul being overcome by the spirit of Jesus Christ. The use of white color on the horse and a dark background also draws the attention of the viewer and provokes emotions on the various scenes displayed.

  3. Dramatic contrasts between light and dark, light and shadow is another feature of baroque art. In this painting, Caravaggio uses shadow and light to amplify the drama and meaning of the picture. In front of Saul’s face is a strong light signifying God’s light that has knocked off Saul his horse, and his arms stretched out towards the light in a funnel shape to accept the light. Meanwhile, the man and the horse who embody the ordinary world and are not in the know of the full experience are in deep shadow.

  4. Use of themes such as conversions, intense light, and intense psychological moments which are part of the common themes during the Baroque period.

Link:https://www.thinglink.com/scene/692651785524871170

References

Renoir, A., &amp Jourdain, F. (1947). Le Moulin de la galette.Budek Films &amp Slides.

ART MOVEMENT

ARTMOVEMENT

Conversionon the Way to Damascus-Caravaggio in the Baroque Movement

  1. There is an overlapping effect of figures in the Conversion on the Way to Damascus-Caravaggio painting making it look a bit jumbled. This was very different from Renaissance paintings that had clear lines of each figures. The placement of the characters is not in an orderly manner, they are positioned in such a way that they intensify the moment of conversion. St. Paul who is the main character is flung off his horse and is on his back on the ground, the horse is right in front of him while the groom is standing behind the horse in an overlapping manner.
  2. Depictions feel physically and psychologically real and this is achieved through the dramatic use of color. The painting shows Paul as broken down with his arms up and overcome by another man with a brightly visible horse. This serves to illustrate Saul being overcome by the spirit of Jesus Christ. The use of white color on the horse and a dark background also draws the attention of the viewer and provokes emotions on the various scenes displayed.

  3. Dramatic contrasts between light and dark, light and shadow is another feature of baroque art. In this painting, Caravaggio uses shadow and light to amplify the drama and meaning of the picture. In front of Saul’s face is a strong light signifying God’s light that has knocked off Saul his horse, and his arms stretched out towards the light in a funnel shape to accept the light. Meanwhile, the man and the horse who embody the ordinary world and are not in the know of the full experience are in deep shadow.

  4. Use of themes such as conversions, intense light, and intense psychological moments which are part of the common themes during the Baroque period.

Link:https://www.thinglink.com/scene/692651785524871170

References

Renoir, A., &amp Jourdain, F. (1947). Le Moulin de la galette.Budek Films &amp Slides.