Renaissance Art Movement

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RenaissanceArt Movement

RenaissanceArt Movement

Therenaissance art movement emerged in the 14thcentury, mainly in Italy. Renaissance literally means the rebirthwhich describes the revival of art in the European society. From ageneral perspective, the renaissance era described the philosophicalchanges from the religion dominated European society to the moreindividualistic society. The philosophical and social changes had ahuge impact on art. As a result of this impact, a distinctive form ofart, known as the renaissance art emerged. Most importantly, thephilosophical changes introduced individual expression as well as anew concept of worldly experience which formed the main themes inmajor arts during the period. Additionally, the emergence ofrenaissance art movement was influenced by the increasedsophistication of the European society. During the renaissanceperiod, the European continent experienced relative political andsocial stability and rapid economic growth. The society alsoexperienced rapid development in the education system which led toconstruction of libraries and other academic facilities. There werealso religious and political factors that impacted on the developmentof the renaissance art. Some of the most celebrated patrons ofrenaissance arts movement include Pope Leo X and Pope Julius II aswell as Medici and Sforza family in Italy. It is also important tonote that some of the major works of art in the renaissance periodwere commission by the Catholic Church and were used to decorate thechurches. Also, majority of renaissance paintings were religiousimages of the Virgin Mary, Jesus or the last supper and wereincorporated in religious activities by the Catholic Church. However,artists on the renaissance society came from all strata in thesociety. Thus, in addition to religious works of art, other themes inart included family life, human body, everyday life experiences andlife (Johnson, 2005).

Reference

Johnson,G. (2005). Renaissanceart: a very short introduction,Oxford: Oxford University Press.